Industrial Technology
Brenda Kelley, Chairperson

Safety Goggles Policy
Students enrolled in any of the Industrial Education lab classes will be required to have a pair of approved safety glasses covering their eyes as they enter. Students are responsible for the safekeeping and storage of the glasses.  We cannot provide space in the shops for storage. Any glasses students bring in must meet ANSI-Z87 specifications for safety eyewear and be approved by the instructor. Extra pairs of glasses will be available from the teachers for rental if the students forget their glasses.

Industrial Education3600 Introduction to Trades & Industry 1
Prerequisite: None   Grade: 9   Credit: .50
This course consists of planned learning experiences designed to introduce the student to the new technologies of the Illinois Plan for Industrial Education. Students will also be introduced to various types of trade and industrial occupations and the skills needed for these occupations. Instruction will foster an awareness and understanding of technologies in communication and transportation. (Emphasis in Metals and Drafting). Safety will be stressed throughout. Lab fee required. (General) (I110)

3601 Introduction to Trades & Industry 2
Prerequisite: None    Grade: 9   Credit: .50
This course consists of continued and expanded introductory planned learning experiences related to the Illinois Plan. Instruction will foster an awareness and understanding of technologies in energy utilization and production. (Emphasis in Woods and Electronics). Safety will be stressed throughout. Lab fee required. (General) (I115)


3831 Auto Mechanics 
Prerequisite: None     Grade 11, 12     Credit: 1.0
This course provides experiences related to maintenance, repair and servicing of a variety of transportation and maintenance equipment. Planned learning activities will allow students to become knowledgeable of fundamental principles and methods and to develop technical skills related to auto mechanics. Instruction includes safety principles and practices, combustion engine principles and maintaining, servicing and repairing different types of transportation vehicles. Lab fee required. (General) (I330)

3955 Advanced Auto Mechanics
Prerequisite: Auto Mechanics     Grade: 12    Teacher Recommendation      Credit: 2.0
Two hours per day. Advanced Auto Mechanics is designed to apply the theory and principle of the automobile to the practical applications in troubleshooting problems found in the automotive field. Upon successful completion of the course the student will meet the measurable performance objectives that are pertinent to entering the world of work or further training as an automotive technician. The curriculum is designed to familiarize the student with the major mechanical areas of the automobile power plants, drive lines, final drives, brakes, suspension systems, and electrical systems. The student will also receive training in trouble shooting using the necessary test equipment.  Lab fee required. (Advanced) (I430)

3727, 3728 Introduction to Carpentry 1
Prerequisite: None           Grade: 10, 11, 12           Credit: .50
This course consists of planned learning experiences designed to introduce the student to construction-related occupations and the knowledge and skills needed for these occupations. Areas of instruction include tools, materials, techniques, equipment, and processes utilized in the carpentry areas of construction. Lab fee and project fee required. . The Illinois Learning Standards (ILS) addressed in this class are mathematics, science and language arts. (General) (I240)

3823 Construction 1 & 2
Prerequisite: Introduction to Carpentry 1           Grade: 11, 12           Credit: 1.0
Construction 1 and 2 is designed to emphasize the construction industry. It is also designed to provide comprehensive groundwork for construction. Instruction covers, but is not limited to, topics of blueprint reading, residential floor/wall roof framing, estimating/structural computations, excavation, footings and foundations. This course provides comprehensive background in the use of power tools. Instruction covers: interior walls, interior and exterior doors, window framing, roof and rafter construction, and finish carpentry work. Emphasis will be placed on good work habits and practices and the safety of both hand and power tools. The Illinois Learning Standards (ILS) addressed in this class are mathematics, science and language arts. Lab fee required. (General) (I343)

3953 Advanced Construction (Building Trades)
Prerequisite: Construction 1 & 2           Grade: 12           Credit: 2.0
Dual credit is available through Southwestern Illinois College for students who are 16 or older by the end of the term enrolled (CMT101 Internship 4 cr.). This course will take place off campus, at a Belleville area construction site to be determined. Students are required to provide their own transportation to and from the site for this two hour home building activity. Advanced Construction consists of planned learning experiences designed to provide the student with basic skills, knowledge, and practical experience for entry-level employability in a large variety of construction and construction related professions. Learning activities refine and provide practical application of technical knowledge and skills developed in the prerequisite construction 1 & 2 course. This curriculum incorporates communication (oral & written), on-the-job training, job shadowing, and real life projects throughout the program as primary learning activities. Instruction includes, but is not limited to the following topics:  Advanced safety, advanced hand & power tools, construction plans & blueprints, international building codes, Illinois plumbing code, National electrical Code, and the practical applications of mathematics. Construction topics of masonry, concrete flatwork, foundations, floor systems, walls, ceilings, roof & rafters, windows, doors, energy conservation, insulation, drywall, siding and exterior trim, interior finish trim and paint. Plumbing topics of plastic, copper, & steel pipe and their associated fittings; Drain, Waste, & Vent (DWV) systems; water distribution, faucets, valves, and fixtures. Electrical topics of electrical service entrances; temporary power systems; electrical wiring, voice and data systems ; circuit breaker panels , lighting fixtures, switches, and receptacles. Mechanical systems topics of HVAC, duct systems, and water heaters. Installation of flooring systems, kitchen cabinets, bath vanities, and appliances. The Illinois Learning Standards addressed in this course are English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Science, Physical Development & Health, Fine Arts, and Social/Emotional Learning (SEL) with specific contributions in fulfilling Goals 1, 3 through 27 and SEL Goals 1 through 3. (I442)

3717, 3718 Introduction to Drafting 1
Prerequisite: None           Grade: 10, 11, 12           Credit: .50
This course consists of planned learning experiences designed to introduce the student to drafting related occupations and the knowledge and skills needed for these occupations. Units will foster an awareness and understanding of drafting terms, drafting instruments and their uses, lettering styles and procedures, sketching and shape description, geometric construction, multi-view projection, architectural designs, and blueprint reading. Lab fee required. (General) (I250)

3821 Drafting Skills 1-2 CAD
Prerequisite: Introduction to Drafting 1           Grade: 11, 12           Credit: 1.0
Drafting Skills 1 is designed to provide students interested in a career in drafting with information and practical experience needed for the development of job-related competencies. The course content includes planning and organizing activities, researching information, preparing various mechanical and architectural sketches and layouts, detailing drawings, such as sectional and isometric views, using various reproduction techniques, and using CAD command processes to produce CAD grid drawings. Drafting Skills 2 CAD continues the learning begun in Drafting Skills 1 and emphasizes the areas of performing presentation techniques such as producing architectural drawings, drawing light commercial building plans, interpreting codes, and constructing structural working drawings, producing mechanical and electrical/electronic working drawings, producing civil engineering drawings using and producing CAD drawings. Lab fee required. (General) (I353)

3951 Architectural Drafting 1 & 2 CAD
Prerequisite: Introduction to Drafting 1           Grade: 11, 12           Credit: 1.0
Architectural Drafting 1 has been designed to serve the needs of the students desiring advanced knowledge and preparation for architectural engineering. This course provides learning experiences related to the design and building of a scaled model of a dwelling for a particular individual. Typical drawings consist of such items as floor plans, foundation plans, landscape plans, elevations, roof plans, wall sections, kitchen details, rendered exterior perspectives, stair sections, interior perspectives, structural sections and fireplace details. Architectural Drafting 2 is an expansion and continuation of Architectural Drafting 1. Students will participate in learning experiences related to the design and building of a scaled model. Students will receive advanced knowledge and preparation in such areas as electrical planning, heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning; plumbing diagramming; modular component planning; building codes; cost analysis; and legal considerations. Lab fee required.  (Advanced) (I453)

3747, 3748 Introduction to Electronics 1
Prerequisite: None           Grade: 10, 11, 12           Credit: .50
This course consists of planned learning experiences designed to introduce the student to electricity and electronics occupations and the knowledge and skills needed for these occupations. Areas of instruction include electron theory, energy sources, OHMS law, AC and DC circuits, and the equipment used in analyzing and testing. Learning takes place through lecture, demonstration and experimentation. Electronic systems such as radio, television, and computers will also be introduced. This course offers an excellent exposure to the world of electronics. Lab fee required. (General) (I260)

3833 Electronics 1 & 2
Prerequisite: Introduction to Electronics 1           Grade: 11, 12           Credit: 1.0
This course provides learning experiences related to the testing, maintenance, and repair of electronic components and circuits. Students will be involved in activities related to the study of circuits found in electronics products such as radio, television, computers, and phonographs/tape recorders. This course will also include solid state theory and AC circuit, analysis, alignment, and troubleshooting. Second semester provides planned learning activities designed to allow students to gain knowledge and skills in the area of digital electronics. Learning activities in this course will emphasize basic building blocks of digital electronics such as AND, OR, NAND, NOR and inverter gates. These basic building blocks will be used to build such things as counters and shift-registers. Lab fee required. (General) (I363)

3961 Electronics 3 & 4
Prerequisite: Electronics 1 & 2           Grade: 12           Credit: 1.0
Provides planned learning activities that are related to various digital and microprocessor circuits. It entails such fundamentals as hexadecimal (machine language) programming and microprocessor architecture. Electronics 4 is a course offering additional digital and microprocessor theory and service. The class continues into microprocessor application and it contains such activities as interfacing to robot and/or controlling a robot arm from a computer.

3827, 3828 Intro to Welding         Prerequisite:  None         Grade:  10         Credit: .50
Introduction to Welding is designed to introduce the student to the basic fundamentals of all types of welding.  Instructions will include safety procedures, identification of oxy-acetylene equipment, electrode identification and make proper settings of arc welding machines when welds are to be made.  Fee required. (General) (I220)

3829 Welding 1-2          Prerequisite:  None          Grade:  11, 12          Credit: 1.0
Dual Credit is available for students who are 16 years of age or older by the end of the course through Southwestern Illinois College (WLD101, 6 cr.) Welding 1-2 is the first of a series of two welding classes that consist of planned learning experiences designed to provide the student with job entry level skills.  Areas of instruction include but are not limited to (1) safety; (2) machine operation – grinders, metal saws, drilling machines and arc welders; (3) introduction to oxy-acety welding; (4) shielded metal arc welding – flat butt welds, vertical butt welds, horizontal butt welds, and overhead butt welds; (5) flame cutting – manual and semiautomatic; (6) heating and forming of metal; and (7) housekeeping.  Welding 2 further develops skills initiated in Welding 1 with additional areas of instruction including:    (1) all position butt welding with heavier metal; (2) vee-groove butt joints; and (3) gas metal arc welding – flat butt weld, vertical butt weld, horizontal butt weld, and overhead weld.  Fee Required.  (General) (I425)

3959 Welding 3-4          Prerequisite:  Successful Completion of Welding 1-2
Grade:  12          Credit: 1.0

Dual Credit is available for students who are 16 years of age or older by the end of the course through Southwestern Illinois College (WLD152, 5 cr.) Welding 3 continues to develop and perfect previously introduced skills.  Additional areas of instruction include:  inspecting of specified jobs; maintenance of equipment; proper material selection; brazing nonferrous metals; air/carbon arc cutting; pipe welding; and spot welding.  Welding 4 perfects job entry level skills that were previously learned.  Additional areas of instruction include:  layout and setup; distortion control; proper rod selection; hardfacing and surface build up; gas/tungsten arc welding; nonferrous arc welding; and weld testing.  Lab Fee and Project Fee Required.  Students must have available supplies previously purchased in Welding 1-2.  (General) (I426)

3963 Shop Foreman 7-8                  Grade:  12            Credit: 1.0
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of all courses in subject areas of interest and/or instructor and department chair approval. 
A student may be chosen as a Shop Foreman to work with a particular instructor to extend the student’s knowledge and abilities in a given subject area.  Also the student will be given responsibilities with the students in a class similar to the responsibilities of a foreman in industry.  The major goal is to develop leadership aspects in the student. (General)





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